Bayer Facts of Science Education XVII

Conducted annually since 1995, the Bayer Facts of Science Education survey series gauges the public’s opinion on the state of science education in the United States, support for reform, and the recognition of the roles that science and science literacy play in everyday life. The surveys have polled a number of different audiences, including the nation’s Ph.D. scientists and science teachers; corporate CEOs of STEM companies and other business leaders; and deans of colleges and universities, as well as parents and the general public. The 2015 survey represents the 17th survey Bayer has commissioned during those 20 years.  To celebrate…

In Japan, the Rise of the Machines Solves Labor and Productivity

Photo caption: An automated lift moves an elderly at a private nursing home in Chiba Photographer: Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg The rise of the machines in the workplace has U.S. and European experts predicting massive unemployment and tumbling wages. Not in Japan, where robots are welcomed by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government.   His government launched a five-year push to deepen the use of intelligent machines in manufacturing, supply chains, construction and health care, while expanding the robotics markets from 660 billion yen ($5.5 billion) to 2.4 trillion yen by 2020. Read more.    

A Sharing Economy Where Teachers Win

Teachers often spend hours preparing classroom lesson plans to reinforce the material students are required to learn, and many share their best materials with colleagues. Founded in 2006, TeachersPayTeachers speeds up this lesson-plan prep work by monetizing exchanges between teachers and enabling them to make faster connections with farther-flung colleagues. As some on the site develop sizable and devoted audiences, TeachersPayTeachers.com is fostering the growth of a hybrid profession: teacher-entrepreneur. Read more.

A Look at What the Public Knows and Does Not Know About Science

A new Pew Research Center survey finds that most Americans can answer basic questions about several scientific terms and concepts, such as the layers of the Earth and the elements needed to make nuclear energy. But other science-related terms and applications, such as what property of a sound wave determines loudness and the effect of higher altitudes on cooking time, are not as well understood. Read more.

Building a STEM Workforce

The Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee spent the summer engaging with scientific stakeholders to inform possible reauthorization of the America COMPETES Act, or legislation authorizing the National Science Foundation (NSF). In July, the Committee put out a request for input on the topic of “Maximizing the Impact of Basic Research.” COSSA submitted detailed comments to the Committee on August 14. The Committee is now seeking input on the topic of “Building a STEM Workforce.” Interested parties are invited to comment. Read more

New Hockey Scholar Course

The National Hockey League Players’ Association (NHLPA) and the National Hockey League (NHL) have announced the launch of Hockey ScholarTM, a new hockey-themed STEM education course. Since its launch in September 2014, Future Goals™ has reached more than 375,000 students throughout the United States and Canada across 3,500 schools, generating more than 1.5 million hours of STEM learning opportunities. The Hockey Scholar course takes students on an exciting educational journey with the goal of winning a virtual Stanley Cup®. As they guide their team, students complete 12 learning modules that educate them and test their knowledge on core STEM concepts…